[Marxism] Kosovo In The Caribbean: The 'International Community' And Haiti

David Quarter davidquarter at sympatico.ca
Sat Dec 11 01:22:06 MST 2004




“Without Aristide there can be no reconciliation,”
said Samba Boukman, a spokesman for the Popular Base
Resistance Movement, which claims to have armed
supporters in all the city’s major slum districts. “We
prefer to fight and die for Aristide’s return,” he
added.




From:           	Rick Rozoff 


http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,3-1398583,00.html


[Compare Colin Powell's, self-interested, demand that
'international peacekeepers get tough' with Haitian
patriots to the obsequious if not completely complicit
behavior of the US State Department and the
self-identified 'international community' in
sanctioning and actively abetting ethnic terror and
mass-scale deadly gangsterism in the Serbian province
of Kosovo over the past five and a half years,
culminating in the ascension of the Western-armed
paramilitary butcher Ramush Haradinaj to the post of
'prime minister' (a position hitherto unknown to
provincial governments) in NATO-occupied Kosovo.
That the 'international community' should have chosen
this year, the bicentennial of Haitian independence,
marking as it did the second anti-colonial revolt in
the western hemisphere, speaks volumes about NATO
nations' commitment to whatever it is today they claim
as their justification for subjugating the world and
its peoples.] 


The Times of London
December 11, 2004


Haiti's hope lies dying in cauldron of guns, gangs and
murder
Despite the presence of 5,000 UN troops, the capital
is still in turmoil
By David Adams  
 
 
-Augusto Heleno Ribeiro, the Brazilian general who
heads the UN military force in Haiti, complained last
week that he was “under extreme pressure from the
international community to use violence”. 


Port-au-Prince - Piles of rotting garbage, rocks and
the carcasses of burnt-out cars litter the
semi-deserted streets of Bel-Air, a poor but once
relatively peaceful neighbourhood near the centre of
Haiti’s capital. 

“The country is completely destroyed,” Léonce Duval,
75, a retired metalworker and resident of Bel-Air,
said. “Things were better with ‘Titid’,” he added,
referring to Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the former
President who was ousted in February after months of
street protests and a brief armed rebellion. 
 
Mr Aristide’s departure was supposed to usher in a
period of political reconciliation and economic
reconstruction. So far, Haitians have little to show
for the change of government, beyond promises of $1.3
billion (£0.7 billion) in foreign aid. 

Despite the presence of 5,000 United Nations soldiers
and police, armed gangs still roam the streets.
Government control is shaky at best in many other
parts of the country. 

Haitians have become so familiar with the sound of
gunfire — day and night — that they jokingly refer to
it as “exploding popcorn”. 

Killings are so frequent that each weekend municipal
workers ferry the unclaimed bodies to a mass grave
outside the city. When the refrigeration unit at the
city mortuary broke down for two weeks, the stench
became so overpowering that offices in surrounding
buildings had to close, including the US consulate. 

The Bush Administration, which helped to engineer Mr
Aristide’s departure aboard a US government-chartered
jet, is increasingly concerned and frustrated by the
failure of the UN to contain the violence [sic]. US
Marines who led a 90-day “stabilisation” force left in
June, turning over peacekeeping duties to a
Brazilian-led UN force. 
....
Augusto Heleno Ribeiro, the Brazilian general who
heads the UN military force in Haiti, complained last
week that he was “under extreme pressure from the
international community to use violence”. 

He said that he commanded a “peacekeeping force, not
an occupation force”. 

His comments came a day after Colin Powell, the US
Secretary of State, demanded that UN troops deal with
the street gangs after gunfire broke out near Haiti’s
presidential palace while he was inside holding talks
with the Government. 

Brazil volunteered to lead the UN force in Haiti, its
largest peacekeeping mission, as part of a diplomatic
push to win a permanent seat on the UN Security
Council. 

It may, however, have underestimated the challenge.
Combined, the rival armed groups have succeeded in
strangling economic activity under the new interim
Government. The rag-tag band of former soldiers
control several ports outside Port-au-Prince, while
the pro-Aristide gang leaders [sic] in the capital say
that they are fighting a “resistance struggle” against
foreign occupation. 
....
Many of the gang members are former public employees
dismissed in recent months from municipal jobs in the
capital. They complain that they are targets of
assassination by rival gangs financed by wealthy
Haitian businessmen. 

“Without Aristide there can be no reconciliation,”
said Samba Boukman, a spokesman for the Popular Base
Resistance Movement, which claims to have armed
supporters in all the city’s major slum districts. “We
prefer to fight and die for Aristide’s return,” he
added. 

Mr Aristide, who said that he was illegally ousted in
a US- engineered “kidnapping,” now lives in exile in
South Africa.
 





More information about the Marxism mailing list